CBHI Blog

Crestwood Behavioral Health


Leave a comment

The Power of Meaningful Roles

blog-fall-roles

Crestwood Behavioral Health’s whole person approach to healing, wellness, recovery and resiliency includes a focus on enhancing or developing a meaningful role in one’s daily life. As psychiatrist and Holocaust survivor, Viktor Frankl, observed, “Life is never made unbearable by circumstances, but only by lack of meaning and purpose.” Research in positive psychology has found that a meaningful role can lead to a positive attitude, increased happiness, sense of belonging, sense of purpose, increased self-worth and promotes self-accountability.

At Crestwood we embrace the need for meaningful roles and it is one of our four Pillars of Recovery that also includes Hope, Empowerment, and Spirituality. It is defined as positive identities within the places we live, learn, work and socialize, which creates a sense of purpose and value. Crestwood’s healing and resiliency-building campuses promote this in many ways. The people we serve contribute daily to our campuses, including co-creating schedules of activities, participating in the functions of the day and educating staff, either through co-presenting at staff education meetings or participating in change of shifts.

Meaningful roles also come from those we are in a relationship with. Our clients are recognized and valued for their relationships as a roommate, parent, child and community member. As a community member, our clients contribute in positive ways such as volunteering at local homeless shelters or animal rescue groups. Clients often also take on the role of teacher or mentor as they come together to support their fellow residents in their healing. Our Crestwood campuses also provide opportunities for meaningful roles through shared group activities such as art shows and sporting events like the Crestwood Olympics, where more than seven campuses get together for fun and friendly competition.

At Crestwood, opportunities for meaningful roles for our clients do not stop at their discharge. Clients are supported in their recovery and wellness journey by being given the chance to come back and contribute through sharing their personal experiences of recovery at our campuses, volunteering in our communities or continuing with a job they achieved through Dreamcatchers Empowerment Network. Patty Blum, Crestwood Executive Vice President, says, “Supporting and encouraging meaningful roles at our campuses helps to provide our clients with a connection to their values, ethics and higher selves. All of these responsibilities -great or small- give their daily existence purpose, and as such, become their meaningful roles.”

Contributed by:
Cindy Mataraso, Director of Operations
Crestwood Sacramento Home Office


Leave a comment

Making Connections through Music

blog-connections

Music Therapy is playing an important role for clients in their recovery at Crestwood Center Sacramento. And it all starts with the drumming circle that was started by Linda Gerardy, a Registered Music Therapist and Director of Recreation, at the campus. “On our Psychiatric Health Facility (PHF) program, I use music with exercise and movement groups, guided imagery and art, and occasional lyric analysis, but my favorite is a weekly Creative Expression Drumming Group, utilizing various hand drums and hand percussion instruments,” said Linda.  “My mantra to clients is that no musical background is needed to have a successful and enjoyable experience in this group.  It is a rarity to have a client answer “No” to “Do you like music?” and the sound alone has a way of drawing in otherwise reticent clients to see what we’re up to.  The variety of instruments provided, learning their names, sounds and capabilities are intriguing, and in most cases, a source of instant success that is empowering and sustaining.”

The American Music Therapy Association defines Music Therapy as a clinical and evidence-based use of music interventions to accomplish individualized goals within a therapeutic relationship by a credentialed professional, and can help promote wellness, manage stress, alleviate pain, express feelings, enhance memory, improve communication, and promote physical rehabilitation for clients.

“The sound of a drum helps us to notice our own heartbeat, the part of us that keeps us alive and vital,” explained Linda.  Drumming in a drum circle with others can be meditative, but also energizing and invigorating depending on how it is structured.   Specific studies conducted by professionals in the fields of music therapy and mental health show us that drumming reduces anxiety, tension and stress, helps control chronic pain, boosts the immune system and releases negative feelings, blockages and emotional trauma.

“Community effects of drumming allow for an opportunity for participants to feel connected with others and gain a sense of interpersonal support.  This is especially important at our PHF program, where the tendency to isolate is evident with many clients, and the need to develop quick connections to others, who are in similar situations, is needed in order to make all of our program groups more meaningful and beneficial,” said Linda.

There are also both cultural and spiritual connections to drumming for several Native American clients who have come through the campus’ doors.  One client patiently informed Linda and her peers that in her tribe’s culture, the same people don’t both dance and drum, so her contribution to the group was to quietly dance her “shawl dance” in a circle around their drumming.  Another client thoroughly enjoyed the drumming, but felt the need to sing as well, teaching them a song in the Chippewa language, after which they were able to provide the rhythmic accompaniment for her singing.

Another positive aspect of a drumming group is the ability for clients to serve in a leadership position, a role which is often difficult to provide in an inpatient setting.  They have had clients with extensive musical backgrounds who easily and willingly take on this task, but even those without any formal music experience are usually quite successful in taking a leadership role once Linda has modeled it for them.

At Crestwood Center Sacramento, the drumming group will continue to be a wonderful outlet for clients to express themselves through music and helping them with their recovery and wellness goals.  Linda summed it up best by saying, “Music, with a drumming group as one small part, is a medium whereby we can more easily connect with ourselves and others.  It truly is a universal language where people can join together, at times free of the need for verbal communication, to be able to experience life more fully.”

Contributed by:
Linda Gerardy, RMT
Director of Recreation
Crestwood Center Sacramento


Leave a comment

Providing a Beacon of Light

blog-beacon-of-light-0316

Crestwood’s Psychiatric Health Facilities Providing a Beacon of Light in the Darkest Moments

There is no more significant moment than the moment when you feel the greatest despair, the moment when you cannot find any controls for your emotions and actions, the moment when you find yourself lost in the streets, homeless, hungry and frightened, the moment when you can no longer endure the life you are living. These times generally get you to the door of an ambulance, police car or crisis center. These are the crisis moments the clients who come to Crestwood’s Psychiatric Health Facilities (PHFs) find themselves in the midst of. This moment is pivotal and can be the beginning of a long and dark road of hospitalizations, or an opportunity to embark on a journey of recovery, serenity and peace.

Crestwood has become one of largest provider of PHFs in the state with programs at our American River, Bakersfield, Solano, Sacramento and San Jose campuses.  The PHFs are designed by and for individuals who are in the middle of crisis moments and need a soft place to land. The PHF environments are cozy, with soft wall paint hues of welcoming color and are decorated with carpet and home furnishings to eliminate the sterile hospital environment feel.  When a client first arrives at one of Crestwood’s PHFs they are greeted in a comfortable welcoming room and are provided with snacks and drinks.  Each client’s initial assessment occurs in this welcoming room and is conducted as a soft inquiry interview, rather than a long list of yes and no questions, which helps to calm the client and put them at ease.

Once a client has been welcomed, they are then provided with a tour of the rest of the environment. The PHFs are small programs, accommodating 10 to 16 individuals, yet each has a large, relaxing living room; dining room and kitchen; group rooms; sitting areas for just visiting; and a serenity room with chaise lounges, walls painted darker soft hues, art and music for contemplation, meditation and peace of mind. The bedrooms have homelike beds with comforters and enough space to allow freedom of movement and privacy.

The PHF programs are designed to be open, enabling clients to choose classes each day, as well as to take the time they need for individual healing rituals such as journaling, sharing stories and laughter. The evidence-based classes available to clients include Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) skills, Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP), and Cognitive Behavioral skills training in anger management, self- soothing, assertiveness training, medication awareness, and life-skills training. The creative arts are also provided as another recovery tool that each person can bring with them as they transition back to their home or community.

The support offered at Crestwood’s PHF programs is exceptional.  The psychiatrists are well-versed in recovery methods and a variety of recovery tools, including medication. The licensed clinical staff and nursing staff are trained in WRAP and have extensive training to avoid coercive treatment. The relationship each staff member has with each client is viewed as one of the most healing recovery tools. Another significant support that is available for clients is peers helping peers.

Clients are also provided with transition training to help prepare them to return home or to a new environment. Linkage to community-based providers is vital at this time, as well as family support and education. With the support of the PHFs’ service coordinators, each client is linked to services, understands their aftercare plan and has an idea of where to get help should another crisis arise.

So it is only with love, compassion, hope and ongoing support that the darkest moments can be transformed into the beginning of a sacred healing journey of recovery and peace.  The Crestwood PHFs provide clients who are in this time of crisis with a safe environment that is warm and welcoming and surrounded by others who have been in their shoes and who can hold hope until they are ready to hold it for themselves.

Contributed by: Patty Blum, PhD
Crestwood Vice President