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Crestwood Behavioral Health


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Transformation – One person, one program, one community at a time.

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The day Crestwood Behavioral Health opened the Kingsburg Healing Center was one of those beautiful moments of transformation. We spend much of our lives working with people and ourselves on transformation, it could be changing a small behavior or a big one, and it may mean adding an exercise routine, revising a Recovery Service Plan, or helping a person find a job.  Transformation may also be seen in the developing of a new program, which was the central theme in the opening our Kingsburg Healing Center.

Transformation for Kingsburg Healing Center began with rehabilitating an old building that had been vacant and lifeless for decades, into a beautiful, warm, welcoming facility. It involved designing a new program that incorporates all of our recovery services such as Homelike Environments, Mind, Body, and Spirit Wellness, Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP), Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), and Trauma-Informed Approaches.  The development of the Kingsburg Healing Center also gave us a chance to get to know the neighbors and community leaders and to start becoming part of such a wonderful community.

Opening week for our Kingsburg Healing Center was very exciting and included an Open House on January 27, where community leaders and neighbors were welcomed in to tour the newly transformed facility and meet the staff. The event began by a warm blessing from Father Gregory, from the Holy Family Parish.  Kingsburg Mayor, Bruce Blayney, then provided opening words and other local community leaders such as Kingsburg District Hospital Board Members Glenn Snyder, Robert Johnson and Arlie Rogers, as well as Kingsburg City Manager, Alex Henderson also added their own words of welcome. Dawan Utecht, Director of Fresno County Behavioral Health, shared her kind words with the group.  Many other community leaders were also in attendance such as City Council Members Staci Smith and Michelle Roman; Chief of Police Neil Dadian; and Steve Safarjian, local broker/owner of RPS Real Estate.

The Open House was a great success with more than 200 community members attending.  One Kingsburg citizen, Mrs. Johnson, commented, “Thank you so much for letting us tour the facility.  Crestwood has done an amazing job transforming the old Hospital.  My husband and I are excited to leave here and tell all our friends what the facility looks like and what we learned from the tour.”  And another Kingsburg citizen, Mr. Lopez, said, “Your staff was so nice and gave us a lot of great information about the facility during our tour.   Thank you for giving the community a chance to see for ourselves all the hard work that has gone into the building and understanding what your company stands for.”

So one week later on February 1st, after two years of planning, challenges, hearings and a lot of hard work, the Kingsburg Healing Center was ready to open for clients!  On that opening day it was a gift to have five clients who were warmly received in our welcome room; who sat watching our fish tank; who walked in our yard; who found a space for a quiet time in our serenity room; who shared in delicious homemade lasagna; and who  slept on new beautiful, comfortable beds. These five people were now on a journey to start their own recovery transformation.

Kingsburg Healing Center is not only a transformation of an old building into a beautiful new program; it also is the beginning transformation in the lives of our clients and their families.  “I want you to know that I think the Kingsburg Healing Center is such a loving and warm place.  It is a wonderful place for my daughter.  She is doing so much better now that she is here,” said one client’s mother. No longer will clients in Fresno County have to travel hundreds of miles for mental health services and no longer will their families have to make long trips to visit them. “I wish this place had been here sooner, it would have been nice to have our son here sooner.  Now that he is back in Fresno County we can see him anytime we want and we know it will help him get better,” said one client’s parents.  The transformations at Kingsburg Healing Center are just beginning.

Contributed by:
Patty Blum, PhD
Crestwood Vice President

 


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Crestwood’s Core Values: Family

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The family unit is one of the most important and influential social groups.  At some point in each of our lives, we are part of a family. Today we have expanded our definition of family beyond the “nuclear” reference and many people have created their own meaningful definition of family in their own lives.

In serving people challenged by mental health issues, Crestwood recognizes how essential family can be to the process of recovery. One of Crestwood’s Core Values is Family, which means our company is committed to providing safe, secure and responsive mental health services to the entire family.  It is estimated that up to 70% of people living with mental health issues live with a family member.

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The needs of families for support, education, and information are evident.  At Crestwood American River, we seek out and actively engage with the family members of our clients, and have become acutely aware of the stress and conflict they are experiencing.  As a result, the American River campus offers a free-of-cost Family Support Group to help families navigate the systems designed to support their family member, provide an outlet for sharing, problem solving and processing of difficult feelings, and creating their own self-care plans.

Our Family Support Group was started in January 2015, and is led by Denise Thompson, MFTI, who is one of the Recovery Service Coordinators at the American River PHF.   The group is a psycho-educational community support group and is open to all family members of past and present clients.  The group is held bi-weekly without fail and members set the topics.  It is a safe, confidential place to share their healing journeys.  They share stories, learn coping skills and Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) techniques, while connecting with each other. One member of the group, Jamie, is a key advocate for the creation of the group and has been regularly attending since it first began. When his family member was a client at Crestwood American River he asked for support, he asked for resources, and he volunteered to be a part of helping others in any way possible. “It is difficult to find the right words to describe the excruciating emotional pain created by seeing a loved one secluded in a mental health facility.  It is difficult as well to describe the gratitude after finding the desperate relief through the sessions offered by Crestwood,” explained Jamie. “When my family member began in the rehabilitation program at American River, my family and I, at that time, did not have support or knowledge of where to go.  All of this was done in order to make things easier for me, and to point us in the direction of the light at the end of the tunnel. Thank you for opening this door of opportunity and healing, which is a great step for me, and for giving me the strength to persist and succeed.”

At Crestwood American River we feel honored to support our clients and their families.  We believe by providing support and education to the families and the community, it leads to inclusion and reduces stigma.  This is what living our Crestwood Values is all about.

Contributed by:
Stacy Small, Clinical Director


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Choosing Recovery

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Recovery is a choice; a person has to choose to be willing to work on their own recovery and actively participate in determining what recovery means to them. Not only is recovery a choice, it is an ongoing choice that is deeply personal and one that a person has to keep choosing every day, even though it may be difficult at times.

At Crestwood Center at Napa Valley when a client is not ready to begin their journey of recovery, we let them know that we are here to help them when they decide they are ready. We are able to offer compassion, support and empathy in a non-judgmental manner. We offer a variety of opportunities they can participate in that will hopefully make their choice for recovery easier such as WRAP, DBT, working for Dreamcatchers Empowerment Network, art therapy, and various addiction-based recovery groups. Independent studies are also available for those not comfortable in groups.

Once one of our clients makes the decision to begin their journey of recovery, it then becomes an ongoing choice, a new habit and a new way of life for them. Eventually, choosing recovery for them becomes easier. Recovery may be difficult for so many reasons such as facing uncomfortable thoughts, doing things they may not want to do, and even things they may believe are unnecessary. Sometimes the process of recovery includes not having much power or control over one’s own life for a time. So we try to provide our clients with tools, skills and plans they can use to gain empowerment and independence. Sometimes the realization of having to make the choice of recovery for the rest of their lives can be overwhelming, but we always remind them to take it one day at a time.  We encourage them by letting them know that when recovery does become a habit, it stops being so daunting.

The work we do at Crestwood Center at Napa Valley can be frustrating at times because we cannot force a client to work on their recovery, as much as we want it for them. But more often than not, our work is very rewarding when we can help a client with their recovery. We can never give up hope and instead we can hold the hope for the hopeless and support their decisions. We can continue to help others discover their own path on the road to recovery by offering counseling, encouragement, our life experiences and our strengths. Our goal is to let our clients know that recovery is a choice that is worth making, so that they can maximize their life and achieve a sense of balance and fulfillment.

Contributed by:
Cheri Tugmon
Service Coordinator
Crestwood Center at Napa Valley


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Building Resiliency in the Treatment of Trauma

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Resiliency is the ability to recover readily from illness, depression, adversity, or the like, and is one of the cornerstones to health and recovery for individuals and communities. Trauma is an emotional and psychological result of extraordinarily stressful events that shatter a person’s sense of security, making them feel helpless and vulnerable in a dangerous world. The necessity to treat and heal trauma has never been more evident than in today’s environment and culture. In recovery services, treating, mitigating and preventing trauma is a primary expectation for us at Crestwood. It is the starting point for most people as they embark on their recovery paths. The ability to restore and build resiliency through a variety of trauma-informed techniques, including engagement, resourcing, spirituality and somatic work is the basis for this integrated trauma-approach to services.

The research in neuroscience provides a foundation for the understanding that neuroplasticity and neurogenesis enables the brain to reprogram and develop new pathways for survival and growth. This has led to an understanding that we can expand the resiliency skills, thus enabling people to be less vulnerable to re-trauma, prevent trauma and heal existing trauma.  The premise is that if you teach a person to identify and access their resilient innate abilities, aptitudes or inner wellness tools, the individual can practice using these tools as a means to heal and prevent trauma. These tools are skill-based and use a wide-range of evidence-based practices, promising practices and spiritual practices as the building blocks. The practices are integrated and enable the staff at Crestwood to walk with our clients, support and stand behind our clients and guide our clients when needed.  The skills and practices are based on the premise that you meet the client exactly where they currently are.  This methodology creates a client- centered and culturally-sensitive service model.

Recovery services now have shifted from patterns that created ongoing dependency for clients, to interventions that support resiliency, self-reliance, and prevention. This trauma-informed model of building resiliency enables our clients to become more empowered, more independent of the mental health system, and more intimately connected to their communities. As Crestwood programs seek to build resiliency in our clients, communities benefit from mitigating the trauma from occurring in the first place, reducing the likelihood of diagnosed conditions recurring, and build resiliency through the community.

Trauma-informed care approaches have been the basis of the resiliency skills building. At Crestwood we utilize these trauma-informed care approaches along with culturally-sensitive multidisciplinary approaches and integrating spiritual practices by utilizing evidence-based practices including Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP), Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), and Peer Providers to provide a rich source for mitigating and healing the impact of trauma for our clients.  In our Crestwood programs we will continue to work with and support our clients with developing resiliency skills to create a strong foundation from which they can build from and use in their recovery.

Contributed by: Patty Blum, PhD
Crestwood Vice President


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First Impressions

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In life we only get one chance for a few things – one of them is a first impression, so it’s vital we prepare ourselves to give an authentic and genuine one. In doing so, we share ourselves with others in the way we wish to be understood.  First impressions can be our calling card and they can be the one element or the one interaction that connects two people deeply.

At Crestwood Behavioral Health, we believe in the value of the first impression so we strive to make it the most authentic and positive one possible.  We create the opportunity to meet the person, whether it’s a client, a coworker, a family member or visitor, exactly where they are at. We have drawn from a course created in the hospitality industry called First Impressions to teach the skills needed to make this welcoming and warm first impression.  We included it in the curriculum lessons from Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), the 12-Step Program, Core Gifts, Trauma-Informed Care and Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP). The course framework focuses on the principles of commitment, leadership, attitude, service and support.

The principle of commitment in the First Impressions course emphasizes how to do our very best each day, to make a difference in someone else’s life and by doing so, we then make a difference in our own lives. We commit ourselves to the Crestwood values of family, to holding ourselves with integrity, to compassionately doing our work, to being flexible and forthright, and to have a sense of humor and positive attitude about the serious and challenging moments that frequently occur in our day.

The leadership principle in the course focuses on leading by example. No matter what position you hold in life or at Crestwood, we are certain that we all have an opportunity and responsibility to lead. In life we are all leaders and we must demonstrate our values each day so that we create a sense of positive peer pressure, creating a culture of caring behavior by “paying it forward.”

Attitude is addressed in the course as being reflected in our actions. We promote healthy productive behavior through building skills to increase the self-esteem and sense of value of our clients and staff. We create an environment where skills are taught and practiced to enhance the lives of our clients, families and ourselves, whether it’s DBT, Trauma-Informed Care approaches or WRAP. This culture of learning creates a positive sense of self which turns into positive performance at Crestwood.

The service principle in the First Impressions course focuses on the work we do and so much more. It is being committed to come to work on time and making each moment count. It is having a smile. It is consistently meeting the needs of those around us with healthy boundaries, dignity and compassion.

And finally the principle of support is addressed on how it holds the first impression and the ongoing relationship together. Support of others starts with self-care. In Trauma-Informed Care approaches we say “put your mask on first, before you can help someone else”, so if you are not healthy and supported, then you cannot provide care and support to others.  Support includes anticipating the needs of co-workers, as well as clients. It is creating a healthy environment where we feel cared for and appreciated. This leads to our sense of pride in the work we do and the people we are.

The First Impressions class at Crestwood teaches each of these values and allows our staff to spend time together sharing their thoughts and developing the rapport to truly emanate team work. The opportunity is always there for a positive first impression and at Crestwood we seize the moment to do so.

Contributed by: Patty Blum, PhD, Crestwood Vice President