CBHI Blog

Crestwood Behavioral Health

New Programs & Innovative Spaces

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Crestwood Behavioral Health Inc. started a big growth spurt in the spring of 2014 from Solano to San Diego. That year we opened two new distinct programs, with some exciting and significant outcomes and contributions. In April 2014, we opened our sixth Psychiatric Health Facility (PHF) at our Solano campus and in June, we opened our seventh Mental Health Rehabilitation Center (MHRC) on our first campus in San Diego. These programs are very different, but serve the same type of clients at different points in their recovery. The PHF is a soft place to land for clients who need to stabilize during a time of crisis. The MHRC is a gentle, homelike space conducive for clients to transition back into the community. The commonality between both programs is that they share the best of all of the research and practices that Crestwood has used in space conversion and intentional space utilization such as the welcoming room, comfort room, serenity room, living room, dining room and library

The welcoming rooms are dedicated to the ritual of welcoming which is based on the research and information shared by Bruce Anderson of Community Activators. It also reflects the principles of Crestwood’s First Impression program. The welcoming ritual is our way of greeting the new client when they come through our doors. This initial engagement in our welcoming room is frequently one of the most important moments in treatment. The welcoming room has comfortable furniture, fruit and snacks and a quiet, peaceful environment for the client to be welcomed into our facility. The assessment process is also part of our welcoming ritual. We use a conversation approach for the assessment and we utilize the CARF-accredited Primary Assessment that is designed to be a narrative discussion with the client. This has been an effective tool in initiating the relationship with the client, setting them at ease and garnering the most accurate and authentic information.

Crestwood’s comfort rooms provide clients with a calming place to be. We designed our comfort rooms based on extensive literature review, visits to calming and comfort rooms in New York State, attendance at conferences and interviews with experts in the field.  Our comfort rooms are used as a tool to teach individuals calming techniques in order to decrease agitation and aggressive behavior. The goal for clients in using the comfort room is to develop practical skills that can be used in inpatient settings and after being discharged from care.

Our serenity rooms are based on research from a New York State grant on Positive Alternatives to Restraint and Seclusion (PARS) and serve a dual purpose. The first is to provide a space that is calming and self-regulating for clients to be in that then reduces the likelihood of coercive treatment. The secondary purpose is to honor the spiritual growth of each client by creating a sacred space designed to support them on enriching their spiritual journey. Our serenity rooms are dedicated to support the internal growth and opportunity for contemplation, meditation and introspection.

The living rooms in our programs are designed to be an environment that is specifically for the community to congregate and visit. It is based on the promising practice in the Living Room model from Recovery Innovations. The space is less clinical and is as homelike as possible. The colors are comforting and the furnishings are aesthetically pleasing.  This room can be used for community meetings and occasionally for groups and staff interactions. It is a place where people are treated with respect, have choices and feel safe.  The other elements of the Living Room model that are in place include peer providers, Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP), inclusion and comfort. This model is closely aligned with the full-array of trauma-informed care approaches that we employ.

Our library space is designed to provide another indoor space to be used by and for the clients.  This space has resources including self-help books, meditation books and books for leisure. The space is light and open at all times for clients to use.

Crestwood’s dining rooms support our wellness initiative which includes healthy heart diets and exercise. This room is also used for recreation activities, movies, arts and crafts, games and therapeutic groups.

One room that we don’t have in the programs are the restraint and seclusion rooms.  Crestwood has an initiative to eliminate the use of restraint and seclusion so we have created a trend of decreased restraints and a greater understanding and awareness of the issues surrounding their use.  In 2011, Crestwood received a grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to attend the Effective Use of Peer Programs to Prevent the Use of Seclusion and Restraints Conference in Boston.  Crestwood was recognized at that training as one of the leaders nationally on reducing seclusion and restraint throughout our organization. Our level of seclusion and restraint for similar programs was one-fifth the national average according to SAMHSA consultants. Crestwood incorporates trauma-informed approaches into each program, as well as using WRAP principles and Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) assumptions to create antecedent plans for clients and staff.

As a result of creating these types of innovative spaces in our programs, Crestwood has been recognized by SAMHSA for the effective use of space and the positive effect it has on each client’s outcomes. All of these spaces are designed to provide our clients with the best environment possible to support their recovery.

Contributed by: Patty Blum, PhD, Crestwood Vice President

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